Are You Selling What Your Clients Want?

In my Design and Refine Program, the very first topic I tackle with studio owners is defining what it is that they sell. No two answers are ever the same, and often, the answer is not as you would expect.

When writing copy for marketing, advertising, and promotions, business owners often list the attributes of their offering. That is what they do, or make for clients, and they do this from their own personal perspective.

This is good, but it only gets you so far. Sometimes, business owners can miss the mark and fail to highlight the real value of what they do.

Understanding what is behind a sale takes your business a whole other level. Understanding what clients truly get out of your product or service is very powerful.

If you are prepared to do some soul-searching and to challenge yourself, you will uncover some truly eye-opening insights into your own business.

  Photo by Rafal Olkis/iStock / Getty Images

Imagine you own a bike shop (perhaps you do!). How would you go about marketing your business? Would you start by listing the brands of bike you have in your store, the types of bike you sell, the size of your store, the location of your store? Probably. These are all important, but the don’t speak to the heart of why your clients come to you.

What if, in addition, you focused on the feeling that a short or a long bike ride gives, of satisfaction, freedom or accomplishment. The improvement in fitness or the money saved on commuting. How about if you described the way it feels to ride a bike; the breeze against your face, the thrill of speed or the relaxing motion of pushing the pedals. The joy of riding alongside friends and discovering new routes, of climbing that hill and coming down the other side. What would that spark in your clients?

In fitness, the reason clients come and continue to come back is not necessarily because of the obvious reasons. There are many, many more reasons. In boutique fitness particularly, the success of your business comes down to the way you make your clients feel while they are in your studio and the way your workout makes them feel (and look) when they are outside of your studio.

Focusing on the meaningful and personal benefits of your service is powerful for your business.

How can you do this?

  1. Ask questions. Have a list of questions that trigger your clients to share with you why they visit. Listen carefully to their answers and ask more follow-up questions to learn the root of their need.
  2. Observe. Watch and see how your clients interact with your business. Watch them as they consider buying from you,

No matter what you sell, it’s important to understand what drives clients to seek your services and ultimately what they get out of it. Don’t assume you already know. Not only can this help you tailor your marketing to express how you truly help them and appeal to more clients.

You will likely discover opportunities for you to do it better, and you will carve a niche for yourself in the process.

Good luck!